• 3 hours ago
    • 32904

    motorcyclles:

    Cute things: Ming Hua’s coat.

    • 7 hours ago
    • 1220
    • 12 hours ago
    • 655

    buttsweats:

    where i work we rent out a variety of buildings and to make a long story short i’m going to hell

    • 17 hours ago
    • 125577
    • 17 hours ago
    • 375660

    Crepe date night

    • 3 days ago
    • 1

    mateocalamity:

    I read up on this and someone also said this “The metal bender who saved Korra’s father the end of Book 3’s finale was voiced by Robin Williams daughter. She got to act out a character who saved an important father figure, when she was unable to save her own” 

    (Source: based-gojira)

    • 6 days ago
    • 5374

    120 lbs of pork bones cooking for 20 hours.

    • 1 week ago

    🍜🍥🍥🍥

    • 1 week ago

    Icebox macarons & cookies

    • 1 week ago
    • 2

    dertbaggg:

    PLEASANT DERTBAG 

    Purchase the shirt thru Pleasant

    Purchase the PE shorts thru dertbag

    (Source: ambriz1991)

    • 1 week ago
    • 32

    unconsumption:

    How Do You Feel About Being Turned Into Compost When You Die? | Co.Exist | ideas impact:

    Even when we’re dead, most Americans keep adding to our carbon footprints. Can the rituals around death be redesigned to become more sustainable?

    With her Urban Death Project, designer Katrina Spade has been working on a greener alternative for the last three years. Along with the environmental issues, the design also considers the problem of space—cemeteries in the U.S. take up about a million acres of land, and as populations grow, even more space is needed. Spade wanted to find an answer that would allow people to be buried in cities.

    The design uses composting to turn bodies into soil-building material for nearby farms and community gardens, so people literally become part of the city they once lived in. A four-story building, which Spade envisions being built in neighborhoods across a city, would serve both as composter and a place for ritual, where family members could see the deceased person for the last time. The composting process would take about two years.

    More here.

    • 1 week ago
    • 127

    "First we form habits, then they form us. Conquer your bad habits or they will conquer you."

    — Dr. Rob Gilbert. (via quotedojo)

    • 1 week ago
    • 45

    Thyramine loaded charcuterie

    • 1 week ago